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Call for Pitches: Asian America x LGBTQIA+

Several paper cranes organized into a rainbow

How does Asian American identity shape or complicate queer identity? Why is the intersection of LGBTQIA+ identity with the Asian American community so often overlooked? How do we find common language to talk about gender and sexuality across the distinct cultural contexts that make up the Asian diasporic experience?

Reappropriate is excited to solicit pitches for short- or long-form personal essays on the topic of Asian American x LGBTQIA+ identity. Experienced or novice essay writers are encouraged to submit a brief pitch or full-length draft here.  

Created in 2002, Reappropriate is one of the web’s oldest and most popular Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) race advocacy and feminism blogs. The blog’s writing focuses on race, gender, identity, Asian American history, and current events.

American Citizens for Justice Releases Educational Guide Commemorating 40th Anniversary of Justice for Vincent Chin

Journalist Helen Zia speaks at a protest seeking justice for Vincent Chin in the 1980's. (Photo credit: Corky Lee)

This year marks 40 years following the death of Vincent Chin, whose brutal hate crime killing in Detroit, Michigan in June 1982 sparked a nation-wide movement that galvanized the Asian American community. To mark the occasion, American Citizens for Justice (ACJ) released a 64-page Legacy Guide that they hope can be used by middle- and high-school educators to teach about Chin’s impact on Asian American history and contemporary politics.

Importantly, the Guide is published in partnership with the Vincent and Lily Chin Estate: Helen Zia, a journalist who raised early awareness about Chin’s murder and who serves as executor of the Vincent and Lily Chin estate is a co-founder of ACJ, which created the Guide. Last year, a podcast about the Vincent Chin case was pulled after it was revealed that Zia had never been contacted by the podcast’s producers.

Continue reading “American Citizens for Justice Releases Educational Guide Commemorating 40th Anniversary of Justice for Vincent Chin”

Frankie Huang Joins Reappropriate as Co-Editor

Reappropriate is delighted and honored to welcome Frankie Huang as our new Co-Editor. Frankie is a Chinese American culture writer, editor, and illustrator whose work focuses on culture, identity and society from the dual outsider/insider perspective of an immigrant, and through the lens of intersectional feminism. 

Frankie has extensive experience both as a freelance writer and as the previous deputy editor-in-chief of JoySauce, where she edited reported features, cultural criticism, personal essays, and opinion pieces that interrogate the world and popular culture from the points of view of marginalized identities. Frankie’s work has appeared in numerous outlets, including The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Guardian, Washington Post, Vulture, and McSweeney’s, as well as at Reappropriate. Frankie has also appeared on numerous podcasts and radio shows including Culturally Relevant with David Chen, Model Majority Podcast, They Call Us Bruce and The Takeaway. 

Frankie is dedicated to mentoring new writers and helping them find their flow and their voice. We are excited to have Frankie’s vision, energy, and passion join our team here at Reappropriate, and we hope you will stay tuned as we pursue exciting new initiatives.

Am I Asian American Enough? 

Photo of Mia at 3-years-old, with short black hair and bangs. She sits on her foster mother's lap, looking at the end of a pen light. Her foster mother is Korean. She has a pink My Little Pony in her other hand. Sitting next to her foster mother is her adoptive mother, who is white.

By Guest Contributor: Mia Ives-Rublee

I spent my childhood hearing from white adults about the immoralities of Asians. I was told about how strict Asian parents were and that Koreans were too patriarchal. People would go out of their way to show me negative news articles that talked about Asians in a bad light. They insisted I was lucky to not have parents like that. 

The continual feed of negative attitudes rubbed me the wrong way, making me want to be less and less connected to the Asian American community. As a child, I ascribed to the colorblind philosophy that adults pushed upon me. Oftentimes, I forgot I was Asian unless someone pointed out some physical difference I had. 

Continue reading “Am I Asian American Enough? “

Stop Ignoring Our Pain. Stop Discounting Our Trauma.

Photo by Adam Krypel on Pexels.com

Nothing stings quite like the pain of erasure. Nothing hurts quite like the onslaught of racial violence rendered invisible in the public eye. Nothing dehumanizes quite like the cavalier dismissal of the racism, the misogyny, the attacks, the murders.

Nothing demoralizes quite like the insistence that everything is alright because it is all happening just over there – just out of sight.

Continue reading “Stop Ignoring Our Pain. Stop Discounting Our Trauma.”