Taco Bell parent company appropriates banh mi, finds new target in Vietnamese for cultural insensitivity

The logo of Yum! Foods' newest endeavour, Banh Shop. Photo credit: Marc Lee
The logo of Yum! Foods’ newest endeavour, Banh Shop. Photo credit: Marc Lee

I’m not entirely sure what we expected from the company that interprets Mexican food as meat-gun applied mystery meat combined with American cheese and Doritos-flavored taco shells sold by a talking Chihuahua dog speaking in Spanglish.

Continue reading “Taco Bell parent company appropriates banh mi, finds new target in Vietnamese for cultural insensitivity”

Bloggers launch #APABookClub to highlight AAPI authors and works

APA-bookclub-banner

Chalk this up to AAPIs yet again using cyberspace in new and creative ways to foster greater community engagement and consciousness-building.

Frustrated by the relative inattention that AAPI authors and books receive in the larger literary and literary review community, two major AAPI blogs — HapaMama (@hapamamagrace) and Smithsonian Book Dragon — have teamed up to use Twitter and blogs as a forum for hosting a brand new digital AAPI book club; one that will hopefully cross geographic boundaries to unite book-lovers of all backgrounds around the rich and dynamic world of AAPI literature.

And yes, that means that you can join the book club, too!

Continue reading “Bloggers launch #APABookClub to highlight AAPI authors and works”

Faces of Asian America: Being Immigrant, Queer and Artist | #APAHM2014

Trungles-self-portrait

 

Trung is a Vietnamese American immigrant queer artist born in a UN refugee camp in the Philippines, who moved to the United States at the age of 2, and who came out to his family at the age of 17.

How do you see yourself — as immigrant, artist, queer or more?

I find myself constantly trying to figure out how to move between spaces instead of settling in them. I am uncomfortable thinking about myself as a sum of parts – everyone knows you are all of yourself at once.  But I often get the sense that I’m always dealing with myself in pieces. The safe spaces availed to me tend to be made for parts of me.

My queer and Asian American identities are prominent parts of my life because they’re the facets of me that are the most often politicized and subject to respectability politics. They’re the ones that I’d always been encouraged to keep quiet about for the sake of politeness.

Continue reading “Faces of Asian America: Being Immigrant, Queer and Artist | #APAHM2014”