The New York Times Doubles Down On Its Erasure of AAPI Student Victims of Suicide

depression

When we were freshmen first entering Cornell, an older student told Snoopy in a dubious effort to introduce us to the realities of campus life, “expect that not everyone in your class is going to make it with you to graduation day.” By this, he meant to prepare us for the eventuality that someone we knew would die by suicide in the four years we would be students at Cornell.

To this day, my friend’s advice still strikes me as disturbing. It bothers me not necessarily because it was untrue — indeed, Cornell has a reputation (perhaps unfairly earned) of an abnormally high on-campus suicide rate, and his words did end up being prophetic for me — but because of the cavalier manner by which they were spoken. This senior student (whom I still count as a friend, by the way) issued this warning almost dismissively; as if he had become jaded on the topic of suicide; as if he believed some baseline rate of suicide deaths should be expected; as if he thought the on-campus suicide rate statistic should just be overlooked; as if he felt that losing a classmate by suicide should be unremarkable.

The loss of a person’s life should never be treated as unremarkable. Yet, too often, that is exactly the kind of treatment that Asian American student victims (as well as other student of colour victims) of suicide face in the mainstream coverage of the larger issue of on-campus suicide. Too often, the intersection of racial identity with on-campus mental health is overlooked, and so the many Asian American student victims (and other student of colour victims) of suicide are rendered invisible.

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Why is the New York Times Rendering the Suicide Deaths of Asian American Students Invisible?

depression-sutdent

This post was written with input and inspiration from Snoopy.

Yesterday, the New York Times profiled Kathryn DeWitt, a young University of Pennsylvania student whose battle with depression and her survival of a suicide attempt motivated DeWitt to become an on-campus mental health advocate. I do not write this post in an attempt to belittle DeWitt’s depression, or her mental health advocacy. Indeed, stories like DeWitt’s are necessary and inspirational, and telling them helps to pull back the veil of stigma and shame that still shrouds the topic of mental illness, depression, anxiety and suicide in university settings, or in the community at-large.

I applaud the New York Times for dedicating ample space to the topic of on-campus suicide by profiling Kathryn DeWitt, and in so doing helping to normalize mental health conversations.

But, in an article that comprehensively touched on so many topics relevant to student mental health — academic pressures, obsessive perfectionism, helicopter parenting,  inadequate mental health resources, and elite universities’ damning readmission policies — how did the New York Times manage to so completely marginalize the Asian American community from the conversation?

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Anti-Asian Incident at Penn Highlights Persistent On-Campus Tensions in the Ivies

University of Pennyslvania's College Hall. (Photo credit: Wikipedia Commons)
University of Pennyslvania’s College Hall. (Photo credit: Wikipedia Commons)

What should have been a fun mixer to celebrate the end of the school semester turned ugly two weeks ago at the University of Pennsylvania. On April 17th, members of the school’s Vietnamese Students’ Association hosted a members-only barbeque event for Spring Fling.

Witnesses say that a non-member student approached the event and asked for a burger. When informed that the event was closed, the student — described by witnesses as an “African American male wearing an OZ tank top” — reportedly said, “Is it because I don’t look like you? I eat rice and watch anime, too.”

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