To Build a Name Brand of Chinese Americans

Pedestrians walk by a mural of the American flag in San Francisco’s Chinatown in February 2007. (Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)
Pedestrians walk by a mural of the American flag in San Francisco’s Chinatown in February 2007. (Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Editor’s Note: This post is an English-language translation of a Chinese-language essay that was widely circulated through predominantly Chinese-language social media outlets such as WeChat earlier this month. I had a chance to meet Steven at the inaugural U-C-A convention last week to discuss ways in which discourse may be improved across the political and generational divide within the Chinese American community. This essay reflects Steven’s thoughts on how Chinese Americans might shape our political future in America.

Download (.pdf): English | Chinese

By Guest Contributor: Steven Chen

This article is dedicated to the first United Chinese Americans convention which was held at Washington, D.C. on September 8th, 2016. During the convention, Chinese Americans from all over the cou­ntry gathered to lay out a road map for the future success of Chinese Americans. I wish for the success of the convention.

More than a hundred years ago, people from China came across the Pacific Ocean to America to escape from wars, famine, and poverty. For a very long time, Chinese Americans were discriminated against and treated unfairly. Yet, through the unremitting efforts of many generations, we have achieved remarkable success here in America.

We were hard laborers working in abandoned gold mines, now we are entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley;

We were coolies building the Transcontinental Railroad, now we are the engineers building information highways;

We were illiterates, now we are university professors and Nobel laureates;

We didn’t have the right to testify in courts, now we are lawyers and judges;

We didn’t have the right to vote; now we are Congress members, Presidential Cabinet members, and Governors;

We were stereotyped as degraded, exotic, dangerous, and perpetual foreigners; now we are highly educated, high-income model citizens.

The successes we have achieved today were due to the progress of American society and, more importantly, the hard work of all Chinese Americans in building up a good Chinese brand over the years.

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