Reappropriate: The Podcast – Ep. 7 | #AAPI and Interracial Relationships

Think you know what a BAD is? How about a SCAB?

Episode 7 of Reappropriate: The Podcast is now live! In this episode, I’m joined by guests Juliet Shen (@juliet_shen, Fascinasians), KJ Park (@kyungjunpark), and Trungles (@trungles) to discuss how the interracial relationship issue within the AAPI community informs — and is informed by — notions of gender, sexuality and white supremacy. Definitely worth checking out!

You can stream the audio and video of the episode through YouTube (above) or just the audio version (below). Subscribe to the podcast through the iTunes store or through YouTube.

Next episode: Please join me next week (October 6th, 9pm EST / 6pm PST) for part two of my conversation with Cayden Mak (@cayden) of 18MillionRising on digital activism as decolonial tools of social change. You can RSVP to watch here!

 

Reappropriate: The Podcast – Ep. 5 | What is #AAPI #feminism?

I’m really excited to present the newest episode of Reappropriate: The Podcast, wherein guest Juliet Shen (@juliet_shen) of Fascinasians and I tackle the question “what is AAPI feminism?” It’s a great conversation that talks about identity, movement-building, gender & sexuality (including interracial relationships), and our role models. I hope you will take an hour to watch the podcast through YouTube above, listen to the audio only version using the mp3 player below, or download the podcast through the iTunes store.

Note: In this podcast, I use the word “crazy” a couple of times in a manner that could easily be seen as reinforcing the ableist stigma of the word as negative. I want to draw attention to this because I first want to apologize to any listeners who are offended by my use, and also to underscore that this is a personal language habit I have been actively working on for many months. In the podcast, we talk about always being self-reflective and aware of our internalized -isms as well as conscious and deliberate about everything we do; I think this is a perfect example of what we were talking about and am disappointed in myself for the usage of this word. I think activism and advocacy is always a learning process, and I am certainly not perfect when it comes to challenging my own issues. So, yes, you will hear me slip-up a couple of times in this podcast and use an ableist term, and for that I apologize.

Next episode: Please join me for the next episode of the podcast which will be recording on September 8th at 7pm EST (subject to change). The topic will be “Is digital or hashtag activism ‘real’ activism?”, and to discuss this I’ve invited Cayden Mak (@cayden) of 18MillionRising onto the podcast. You will be able to watch the podcast as it records through this link, and you can tweet your questions or comments now to @reappropriate to have them included on air!

Audio only:

TWiB After Dark Podcast on #AAPI Sexuality, Masculinity and Feminism (feat. me!)

Couple Face to Face

Last night, I had the distinct pleasure of participating in a roundtable conversation on This Week in Blackness, one of the web’s premiere race and African American identity podcasts. N’jaila Rhee (@BlasianBytch) hosted a stellar panel discussion on Asian American sexuality and gender identity with guests Matt Salesses (@salesses) of The Good Men Project and Arthur Chu (@arthur_affect) of The Daily Beast (and Jeopardy!), as well as me!

It was a truly phenomenal conversation, and I really want to thank all the panelists and N’jaila for giving me the opportunity to participate!

Please take a minute (okay, an hour) to listen. You can play it directly from this link, or follow the instructions to get it into your iTunes or other media player!

May 19th is #AAPI #HIV / #AIDS Awareness Day: 10 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know

API-HIV-Awareness-Day

This is the 9th year that May 19th will be marked as Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, a day first established by The Banyan Tree Project (an AAPI HIV/AIDS advocacy group) and currently recognized by the US Department of Health & Human Services.

On today’s AAPI HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, here are 10 facts you may not have known about HIV/AIDS in the Asian American & Pacific Islander Community:

Continue reading “May 19th is #AAPI #HIV / #AIDS Awareness Day: 10 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know”

I’m in the 78%: Asian Americans and Reproductive Choice

InInThe78

Wednesday, January 22, 2014, marked the 41st anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, which established a woman’s right to make her own reproductive choices — including abortion — under the Fourteenth Amendment.

Yet, over forty years later, abortion and other reproductive health policies that protect women’s rights continue to be under attack by the Republican Right. Yesterday’s anniversary of Roe was marked by anti-abortion rallies throughout the country, including thousands of pro-life activists who descended onto Washington D.C.’s National Mall. Meanwhile, the Republican Party is debating new guidelines under its national re-branding efforts that would encourage or even require pro-life party members to be more vocal in their anti-abortion stances. These developments predict escalating rhetoric over women’s reproductive health in the coming years; and this growing polarization is only likely to further hinder women’s access to reproductive freedom.

In some studies, Asian Americans women suffer among the highest rates of sexually transmitted diseases; in one, 13.5% of Asian American women in 2001  reported a sexually transmitted infection (STI) compared to 8.3% of White women, and were four times more likely than Asian American men to report an STI. Furthermore, in 2000, 35% of Asian American pregnancies ended in abortion, compared to only 18% of pregnancies among White women. These rates occur despite some studies showing relatively high condom use among Asian American youth; some scientists have argued that despite these findings, cultural stigmas against conversations on sexual topics hinder a comprehensive sexual education among young Asian Americans, leading to gaps in reproductive and sexual health knowledge that can result in high rates of STDs (some that often go unreported) and unplanned pregnancies.

Taken together, these data clearly indicate that reproductive health is a critical, if woefully under-discussed, concern for Asian American women. Furthermore, any effort to target public policies that promote reproductive health access will impact women in our community.

Continue reading “I’m in the 78%: Asian Americans and Reproductive Choice”