SIGN PETITION: Call for Fox News apology for airing of racist slur, and for Bob Beckel’s resignation

bob-beckel-chinaman

The term “Chinaman” is an archaic racial slur dating back to the mid nineteenth century, with a heinous history of dehumanization and violence against Asian Americans (and Chinese Americans in particular). Yet, Fox News co-host Bob Beckel has used this slur on-air not once, but twice, in reference to Chinese and Chinese Americans. Most recently, he referred to Chinese people as “Chinamen” in a July 10, 2014 episode of “The Five”.

Fox News’ ongoing tolerance of Beckel’s anti-Asian racism, and their unapologetic airing of Beckel’s repeated use of anti-Asian slurs, is both unprofessional and an insult to Asian American viewers. 

SIGN THIS PETITION to call on Fox News to IMMEDIATELY issue a retraction and an apology to the Asian American community for their airing of Beckel’s usage of racist slurs, and to call upon the network to terminate Beckel’s position as Fox News co-host. Then, share the petition with all of your friends.

List of Posts in Week of #Solidarity with #NotYourMascot | #AAPI #Native #NDN

change-mascot

Recent events have allowed mainstream media to paint a picture of Asian American and Native American communities as being at odds in #NotYourMascot: the fight to call on Washington R*dskins owner Dan Snyder to change the name and mascot of his NFL team, both of which are deplorable examples of redface stereotypes against Native peoples. Sadly, in the aftermath of the last two weeks and the attention placed on Asian American advocacy, Native peoples have been functionally “edited out” of their own campaign.

Yet, anti-racist work is a work that should bring together people of colour, not divide us. This week, the AAPI blogging community is dedicating a week of posts in solidarity with our Native brothers and sisters to try and raise awareness for #NotYourMascot and the R*dskins controversy. Many AAPI blogs have committed to writing posts in support of #NotYourMascot, and we will also be re-tweeting the powerful and compelling writing of Native writers.

Please check out all the blogs participating in this week of solidarity and bookmark this post, which will be aggregating all the writing done this week.

Please also check back for updates.

This post was last updated April 17th 12:00PM EST.

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Affirmative Action: When class is not enough

Photo credit: LA Times
Photo credit: LA Times

Over the last two weeks, I’ve written a series of posts about affirmative action initiated by the fight over SCA5, a bill that would have amended the California constitution to repeal Prop 209 for public education and restore narrow considerations of race to the college admissions process as part of holistic review of qualified applicants. SCA5 was withdrawn after backlash from Asian American voters, but the fight over the morality of race-based affirmative action rages on — particularly in the comments section of my posts, where I’ve been privileged to host several forums to encourage further discussion on this subject.

One significant point of contention is the use of race vs. class in affirmative action. Whereas some SCA5 opponents have lobbed radically non-factual charges against race-based affirmative action, others are more moderate in their counter arguments; they assert that whereas use of race-based information is discriminatory, class-based affirmative action is a reasonable alternative.

And, indeed, the fight over race vs. class-based affirmative action has persisted in liberal circles for years; most recently, support of class-based affirmative action was cited as part of Tanner Colby’s diatribe against race-based affirmative action in Slate.

The focus on class-based affirmative action is appealing to some liberals precisely because it rejects the unseemly conversations of race that can force a conversation on White privilege. Instead, it blames minority underachievement on classism, not racism, and leaves liberals comfortably in support of increased state spending on social services. Tacitly, they argue, if poor minorities can’t pull themselves up by their bootstraps after we address the impacts of their poverty, their failures must then be their fault. In short, arguments in support of class-based affirmative action is viewed as a panacea for social iniquity, with a concurrent, explicit denial of any further impact of institutional racism on underrepresented minority students.

Ironically, the UC system under Prop 209 provides the perfect counter-argument to these charges. California’s public education system, with its late-90’s rejection of race-based admissions, provide the ideal demonstration of the inadequacies of purportedly “colour-blind” admissions policies that engage in class-based affirmative action in the absence of racial consideration.

Or, as Scot Nakagawa points out, post-Prop 209 college admissions in the UC system demonstrate that “in a racially inequitable society, color blind solutions end up reflecting that inequitable context and often even contributes to its perpetuation.”

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Creationist teacher calls Buddhist Thai American student’s faith “stupid”

Sabine Parish Superintendent Sara Ebarb
Sabine Parish Superintendent Sara Ebarb

This is why we need to protect the separation between church and state, and keep religion out of public schools.

The ACLU took a Louisiana school to court earlier this year after Negreet High school science teacher, Rita Roark, repeatedly denigrated the religious faith of a Buddhist student of Thai descent, calling both Buddhism and Hinduism “stupid”. One incident occurred after the student — identified as C.C. in the lawsuit — refused to answer Ms. Roark’s test question: “ISN’T IT AMAZING WHAT THE _____________ HAS MADE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

According to Ms. Roark, the right answer was “Lord”, and she requires all her students to answer “correctly” for test credit. She marked the question incorrect and publicly shamed C.C. when he first failed to answer the question, and then when he attempted to answer the question with “Lord Boda [sic]” —  a reference to his Buddhist faith — when it appeared on a second exam.

In both incidents, Ms. Roark proclaimed it “stupid” to not fill in a reference to the Christian God, and encouraged her students to also verbally humiliate C.C. for not doing so.

Seriously.

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#DayofRemembrance: 12 images of anti-Japanese xenophobia from the 1940’s (and earlier)

EX9066

72 years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which established military zones in the West Coast, eventually empowering the government to round-up and forcibly intern Japanese Americans during  World War II in one of this government’s worst examples of mass violation of American civil rights. 

To remember this second day that should also live on in infamy (lest we forget the crimes and horrors that were conducted in the name of racism), here are 12 images that capture the anti-Japanese xenophobia and hatred of the era, that helped compel and support the signing of E.O. 9066.

Continue reading “#DayofRemembrance: 12 images of anti-Japanese xenophobia from the 1940’s (and earlier)”