Fox News guest is sorry-not-sorry for comments supporting Japanese American internment and Hiroshima

Wait a minute, Mr. Hoenig. Are you a terrorist?

Last week, I posted about a mind-numbingly horrible segment aired by Fox News’ Cashin’ In regarding anti-Muslim profiling. In it, hedge fund manager Jonathan Hoenig made the following commentary:

We should have been profiling on September 12, 2001. Let’s take a trip down memory lane here: The last war this country won, we put Japanese-Americans in internment camps, we dropped nuclear bombs on residential city centers. So, yes, profiling would be at least a good start. It’s not on skin color, however, it’s on ideology: Muslim, Islamists, jihadist. That’s a good start but it’s only a start. We need to stop giving Korans to Gitmo prisoners, we need to stop having Ramadan and Iftar celebrain the White House. We need to stop saying the enemy is not Islamic. They are.

This was commentary that could only be interpreted as full-throated support for Japanese American internment and the murder of thousands of Japanese civilians when executed in the pursuit of American military victory; Hoenig rationalizes therefore that anti-Muslim profiling is similarly justified (video of full original segment after the jump). Hoenig’s logic is so unspeakably flawed and immoral as to demand an accounting.

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Fox News calls anti-Muslim profiling “a good start”, supports claim by citing Japanese American internment

Fox News anchor Eric Bolling was joined by four guests to argue in favour of anti-Muslim racial or religious profiling.
Fox News anchor Eric Bolling was joined earlier this week by four guests to argue in favour of anti-Muslim racial or religious profiling.

I don’t even know where to begin. I really don’t. So, let’s just start at the beginning, shall we?

Last week, Fox News anchor Eric Bolling of Cashin’ In organized what he dubbed was his “most controversial” segment yet: Bolling invited on four guests to build a collective argument asserting that it was “finally” time to institute anti-Muslim profiling. Oh, yeah.

Bolling wasn’t wrong about one thing (in the midst of being wrong about most things): this segment was certainly controversial. A few other words jump to mind, too — like, “underthought”, “ill-advised”, “fact-starved”, “racist”, and “oh dear God, why?”. This segment made headlines this past week because one guest, hedge fund manager and proud Ayn Randian Jonathan Hoenig, declared that it was time to profile Muslims because something-something-Hiroshima-and-Japanese American-internment. Oh, yeah.

And while this might be the most obviously offensive bullshit uttered in this concentrated five minutes of intense stupid, it wasn’t the only offensive bullshit in there. Not by a long shot. No, the whole segment was like a monsoon of offensive bullshit flooding from their mouths: a veritable torrent of racist verbal diarrhea (video after the jump).

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Asian Americans side with Blacks & Latinos (not Whites) in opinions on police effectiveness & racial profiling

Students at UC Davis tweeted this picture of themselves in solidarity with Ferguson protesters.
Students at UC Davis tweeted this picture of themselves in solidarity with Ferguson protesters.

It has been nearly a month since the fatal shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren Wilson, and in that time, the nation has become engrossed in a long overdue national conversation over race, race relations, racial profiling and police brutality. Countless think-pieces have been written about police brutality, school-to-prison pipelines, racial profiling, the myth of Black criminality, Black-on-Black crime, and cultural pathology. In this past month, it has seemed as if the entire country is struggling through their first “race moment”, forced by Brown’s untimely death to grapple with the fact of institutionalized racism against the Black body; this seems like an issue that too many would rather ignore.

Consequently, several mainstream media outlets have reported on the stark racial divide between Black and White Americans on Ferguson and whether or not racism is a problem in America; nearly half surveyed White Americans think Brown’s shooting death is being overracialized. While two-thirds of Black Americans think excessive force by police is a problem, only one-third of White Americans agree. This clear chasm between Black and White attitudes on race and police effectiveness is both well-documented and not altogether surprising: these answers are heavily influenced by one’s own personal experiences with racism and police brutality, and both economic and skin privilege often protects Whites from unjust run-ins with local police.

But where do Asian Americans — who are both people of colour yet who endure a completely different set of racial stereotypes in America than do other minorities — fall on questions of police brutality?

One recent USC Dornsife/LA Times poll set out to answer that question, and the findings might surprise you.

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Top NYC lawyer: NYPD influenced by anti-Asian & anti-Muslim bias in arresting her for blocking sidewalk

Chaumtoli Huq in a photo from Law@TheMargins
Chaumtoli Huq in a photo from Law@TheMargins

42-year-old Chaumtoli Huq is a top human rights lawyer and formerly a prominent attorney for NYC Public Advocate Letitia James’ office; Huq has received numerous awards for her public service. Huq is also a Senior Research Fellow for the American Institute for Bangladesh Studies, a leader of South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), and editor of Law@TheMargins. Huq has previously taught at New York Law School, and the rest of her CV is as extensive as it is impressive. Recently, Huq embarked on a nine-month leave from the Public Advocates’ Office to focus on workers’ rights efforts in Bangladesh.

In short, Chaumtoli Huq is basically Wonder Woman, which is what makes last month’s events involving Huq and the NYPD all the more galling.

On July 19th, Huq was standing outside of a Times Square Ruby Tuesday’s waiting for her husband and her two children to use the bathroom. That’s when she was approached by two NYPD officers, who told her to move along.

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Watching ASU professor be brutalized by cops reminds how #PoliceBrutality affects us all

Screen-capture of dashcam video showing Officer Stewart Ferrin screaming at ASU professor Ersula Ore moments before he throws her to the ground.
Screen-capture of dashcam video showing Officer Stewart Ferrin screaming at ASU professor Ersula Ore moments before he throws her to the ground.

This is a story that deserves far more mainstream attention than it has received.

On May 20, an Arizona State University professor, Ersula Ore, was walking along a road in the direction of traffic when she was confronted by campus police. She was detained and asked to show ID; during the stop, she repeatedly requested that the police officer speak to her in a more respectful tone. We know this because the entire incident — including what transpires next — was captured on police dash-cam.

Although Professore Ore is heard only questioning the officer’s attitude, the police officer eventually throws Professor Ore onto the hood of his police car in order to arrest her. When Professor Ore protests being put in this position while standing next to a busy road — specifically, she is heard citing the length of her skirt — the police officer became violent. He brutally swings Professor Ore around by her arm. She lets out a series of bloodcurdling screams. She lands on the ground off-camera and was arrested.

This is a clear example of police brutality, one with distinctly racial overtones.

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