The Genocide of Genealogies: For Those Who Refuse To Be Silenced

sunset-cambodia

This post was originally published to Project Ava last year. It appears here today, April 17, 2015, on the 40th anniversary of the fall of Phnom Penh.

By Guest Contributor: Vanessa Teck (@vanessateck)

Many children grow up hearing fantastical tales and listening to nursery rhymes. A magical forest here and furry talking creatures there. I grew up listening to the nightmares of chaos and terror as tragedy consumed Cambodia.

Imagine this.

On April 17th, 1975, Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge. Like many Khmer Americans, my family came to the United States as refugees from Cambodia in 1982. My grandparents reflect back on the day the Khmer Rouge scoured the city and announced over their loud speakers that the Americans were going to begin dropping their bombs. Greeting the citizens with smiles, they expressed that safety was their priority and all those living within the city should evacuate to the countryside. They promised that the invasion would be over and they would be able to return to the city. Yet, it would be four years of terror before any lucky survivors would be able to return to the remains of their homes. My family had no choice but to abandon all of their belongings and at that precise moment, their entire lives.

Continue reading “The Genocide of Genealogies: For Those Who Refuse To Be Silenced”