Help fund Good Luck Soup Interactive: a participatory story-telling project for Japanese American internees!

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Matthew Hashiguchi contacted me earlier today to let me know about his really awesome web-based storytelling project: Good Luck Soup Interactive, which accompanies Hashiguchi’s full-length documentary on the lives of former internees, titled Good Luck Soup (currently in post-production).

Good Luck Soup Interactive aims to collect the stories of the survivors of Japanese American and Japanese Canadian internment camps into a web-based participatory storytelling project. Unlike other projects, this project is unique because it focuses not just on life in the camp, but on the life of internees after the camps and the full trajectory of their experiences.

Check out this video (after the jump) where Hashiguchi explains how the project will work.

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#DayofRemembrance: 12 images of Japanese American strength, patriotism & general awesomeness

Grandfather and child, at Manzanar. Photo credit: Dorothea Lange.
Grandfather and child, at Manzanar. Photo credit: Dorothea Lange.

72 years ago today, Executive Order 9066 was signed. Earlier today, I posted a pictorial retrospective of anti-Japanese xenophobia and internment to commemorate this nation-wide Day of Remembrance. This is the third and final part of my #DayofRemembrance posts.

I present to you 12 historical images of Japanese American strength, patriotism and general awesomeness during and after internment.

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#DayofRemembrance: 10 images of Japanese American internment

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As I posted earlier, today marks 72 years following the signing of Executive Order 9066, which paved the way for the largest mass incarceration and civil rights violation of American citizens in American history. As I wrote earlier this month, internment is still technically Constitutional.

Today is a day to remember this horrible moment in American history, and to vow to never let it happen again. To that end, here are 10 historical images of Japanese American interment.

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#DayofRemembrance: 12 images of anti-Japanese xenophobia from the 1940’s (and earlier)

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72 years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which established military zones in the West Coast, eventually empowering the government to round-up and forcibly intern Japanese Americans during  World War II in one of this government’s worst examples of mass violation of American civil rights. 

To remember this second day that should also live on in infamy (lest we forget the crimes and horrors that were conducted in the name of racism), here are 12 images that capture the anti-Japanese xenophobia and hatred of the era, that helped compel and support the signing of E.O. 9066.

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Korematsu Day: Fred Korematsu and the courage to defend your country by defying it

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Today would have been Fred Korematsu‘s 95th birthday.

Born on January 30, 1919 in Oakland, California to Japanese parents, Fred Korematsu pursued all the trappings of a typical American childhood. He attended public school, participated in the tennis and swim teams, and was conscripted to military service under the 1940 Selective Training and Service Act, which was passed by Congress to boost America’s military defenses in the face of the growing threats of World War II. Although he was rejected by the US Navy due to stomach ulcers, Korematsu was inspired to try and serve his country however possible and sought jobs as a welder at the local shipyard in order to help build American warships. In short, Fred Korematsu was a proud American citizen and a patriot.

Unfortunately, for most of his life, America treated him like a criminal, based solely on his race.

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