Celebrating Canada Day with TessTubeBaby’s “Hey There, Beaver!”

This is awesome. Tess Paras (TessTubeBaby on YouTube and @TessParas on Twitter) made this video to celebrate today’s Canada Day, chock full of Canada’s “most notable” contributions to the world… except for ketchup chips. For shame, Tess, for not including our country’s most beloved chip flavour! For shame!

I'm not saying I've paid people to serve as a potato chip mule for me when they travel across the border. I'm also not saying I haven't.
I’m not saying I’ve paid people to serve as a potato chip mule for me when they travel across the border. I’m also not saying I haven’t.

That oversight aside, this video is such an improvement over the original!

Happy Canada Day, everyone!

British Columbia apologizes to Chinese Canadian community for historic wrongs

BC Premiere Christy Clark introduces a bill that offers formal apology from the province of British Columbia to its Chinese Canadian community for a history of racist laws.
Premier Christy Clark introduces a bill that offers formal apology from the province of British Columbia to its Chinese Canadian community for a history of racist laws.

(H/T Angry Asian Man)

Last Thursday, British Columbia premier Christy Clark introduced a bill to the provincial parliament offering an apology for the province’s contribution to more than a century of historic legislation enacted against the province’s Chinese Canadian community. (For Americans: the premier of a province is the political leader of that province, somewhat equivalent to American governors; one of the main differences is that they hold a seat in the province’s Legislative Assembly and are usually the leader of the political party that holds the majority of seats therein.)

While Americans are familiar with the history of federal and state-level laws that were passed in this country targeting Chinese American immigrants, they may be less aware that most of those same laws and ordinances have Canadian counterparts.

Continue reading “British Columbia apologizes to Chinese Canadian community for historic wrongs”

Canada cancels investor visas: modern Chinese Exclusion, or a sign that Canadian citizenship isn’t for sale?

A boy holds up Chinese and Canadian flags (photo credit: Vancouver Sun)
A boy holds up Chinese and Canadian flags (photo credit: Vancouver Sun)

Although most avenues of legal citizenship to North America involves skill- or job-based visas, one of the lesser-known avenues of immigration to Canada and the US involves visas that are informally referred to as investor visas (a class that I was unaware existed until today). In brief, wealthy foreign nationals — those with a net worth in the millions — have the option to apply for a special visa status if they agree to loan the American government $500,000 (or, $800,000 if you’re trying to immigrate to Canada) for a fixed period; in return, these “investor nationals” are granted permanent residency with an option to apply for citizenship.

Or, in other words, for wealthy foreigners, American and Canadian citizenship is for sale, and the cost is a paltry half a million dollars. Or, rather it’s actually free — the money is returned to the visa holder (interest-free) after three to five years.

Continue reading “Canada cancels investor visas: modern Chinese Exclusion, or a sign that Canadian citizenship isn’t for sale?”