New York City’s Chinese American Democrats Backed Clinton Despite Voting Barriers

A voter enters a Chinatown polling place in 2006. (Photo credit: Getty)
A voter enters a Chinatown polling place in 2006. (Photo credit: Getty)

Hillary Clinton advanced one step closer to the Democratic presidential nomination on Tuesday when she faced off against challenger Bernie Sanders in New York State’s primary race — a major prize in the contest for delegate numbers — and emerged victorious. This race was of particular interest to the AAPI community given that New York City boasts the largest single concentration of Asian Americans of any US city: NYC is home to roughly 1 million adult Asian American citizens who represent ~12% of the city’s residents.

Although structural obstacles continue to stymie Asian American voter turnout, roughly 20,000 Asian American voters turned out in New York City on Tuesday to cast a ballot in the Democratic or Republican primary races. Based on New York Times’ exit polling, Asian Americans were 2% of voters who turned out on Tuesday, up from ~1% in 2008.

Too often, mainstream exit pollsters fail to collect a large enough sample of Asian American or Pacific Islander voters to reveal our community’s voting trends. Thankfully, however, the AAPI community has routinely stepped up to meet that challenge.

Today, the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) — which has organized poll monitoring and exit polling of Asian American voters in New York City and across several states for all major election cycles since 1988 — released the results of their 2016 exit poll from Tuesday’s contest. In compiling the results of their survey of 513 Chinese American voters who cast a ballot in Manhattan’s Chinatown on Tuesday, AALDEF reports that those Democrats backed Clinton over Sanders by 54%-43%, and that 60% of polled Chinese American Republicans favoured (exceptionally racist) Donald Trump over challengers John Kasich and Ted Cruz.

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Kristina Wong: “I swear Bernie Sanders got my back pregnant.”

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Can you get pregnant just by having a guy put his hand on the small of your back? Maybe — if that guy is a Presidential candidate from Vermont and you just can’t stop feeling the Bern!

Full disclosure: I endorsed Bernie Sanders last month. One reason I’m inspired by Sanders is that he has made private meetings with racial justice activists a regular staple of his campaign, which offers unprecedented access by community organizers to a mainstream presidential candidate. Last week, Sanders hosted the first (of hopefully many) such meetings with leaders Asian and Arab American communities. Sanders was joined in hosting the meeting  by one of his surrogates, Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, who recently resigned her position as DNC vice chair in her announcement of her endorsement. Also in attendance were several prominent Asian American and Arab American community organizers — as well as performance artist Kristina Wong, a long-time friend of this blog.

I had a chance to interview Kristina to get her thoughts on the thirty glorious minutes she spent basking the Sanders aura, and how she came to experience a total Bern-ing sensation.

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Why The #DemDebate Exchange Over Henry Kissinger Matters for Asian Americans

Henry Kissinger. (Photo credit: Unknown)
Henry Kissinger. (Photo credit: Unknown)

In a presidential primary cycle that has largely failed to acknowledge or address the growing AAPI electorate, last week the two remaining candidates for the Democratic party’s nomination appeared on-stage for their seventh debate appearance. Many have focused on the debate’s coverage of domestic issues – particularly on the answers by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders on racial justice – but few have focused on a crucial exchange between the two primary candidates that should have critical relevance for the Asian American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) community.

In the latter third of the debate, debate moderators turned the attention of the candidates to foreign policy, and Sanders seized upon the moment to launch into an impassioned critique of former National Security Advisor and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (full video after the jump).

Sanders said:

I happen to believe that Henry Kissinger was one of the most destructive Secretaries of State in the history of the country. I’m proud to say that Kissinger is not my friend. I will not take advice from Henry Kissinger.

Unfortunately, the momentousness of this statement went largely unnoticed by debate viewers; after all, it has been nearly forty years since Kissinger served any president in the White House. But, this rare example of a mainstream presidential primary candidate daring to speak out against Henry Kissinger – who remains a protected pillar of the foreign policy establishment in Washington – is noteworthy.

The AAPI community must, in particular, take heed.

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Why I’m Supporting Bernie Sanders

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This post has been a long time in the making. I’ve spent the better part of the last eight months on the fence, watching the battle lines be drawn in the Democratic primary fight. I weighed the pros and cons of the candidates running to represent the Democratic party in November, and while I’ve found all to be generally acceptable, none have been truly electrifying – or, at least, as electrifying as was a junior senator from Illinois in 2008.

To be honest, I didn’t think it would really matter whom I supported in the 2016 Democratic primary race; I believed that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton would sweep her way to an easy primary victory early this year. I watched as many other highly qualified candidates declined to run, leaving only Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley standing in opposition to Clinton. No matter what I thought of their progressive politics, it seemed unlikely that Sanders and O’Malley would have the resources to seriously challenge the Clinton machine.

Boy, was I wrong.

On Tuesday, Sanders accomplished the seeming impossible when he earned a near tie with Clinton in the Iowa caucus – a mere .3% of the vote separated the two candidates. For a candidate who once trailed Clinton by more than 20 points in the state, Sanders’ second-place finish proved that his candidacy is, in fact, a viable one.

More to the point, I feel Bernie Sanders is the right candidate to support in the 2016 Democratic primary.

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Mike Huckabee tweets racist anti-Asian joke during CNN Democratic Debate

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I get that tonight’s Democratic debate has been highly entertaining, but this tweet from Mike Huckabee sent just a few minutes ago is super fucking racist.

Last night, several of the candidates for the GOP nomination took the opportunity of the Democratic Party’s first presidential primary debate of the season to live-tweet. And, by live-tweet, I mean troll. In stark contrast to the nuanced policy debate taking place on stage in Las Vegas where candidates were searching for respectful differences in opinions and strategies, Donald Trump and Huckabee spent the majority of last night composing 140 character insults and ad hominem attacks. Although Trump declared that no former mayor of Baltimore should ever be president, it was Huckabee who made waves with a tweet referencing the racist stereotype that Asians are untrustworthy and barbaric eaters of dogmeat.

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