M. Night Shyamalan is Kind of Sucking Right Now

I shamelessly stole this picture from Angry Asian Man. Why? Because it is hilarious. Sorry Phil!

Phil, of Angry Asian Man, had a chance to screen The Last Airbender last night, which seems like a good idea considering how much hullabaloo has surrounded the film. Here’s an excerpt:

the last airbender: this movie could boycott itself

I have seen The Last Airbender movie. Let me be clear: I did not pay to see it. But the screening opportunity came up, so I watched it — I’ve talked about the film enough, I figured I should at least see it for myself. And now I share my observations with you:

My one-word review via Twitter, immediately after watching the film: joyless. Overall, The Last Airbender completely lacks soul, and suffers from a painful inability to inspire any kind of fun or awe throughout the entire movie. I thought I’d at least enjoy the visual effects, but that fails to impress too. Even setting aside the problematic racial politics, this is just not a good movie.

M. Night Shyamalan attempts to adapt the entire storyline of season one (Book 1: Water) into this movie (the first of a planned trilogy). Having seen and enjoyed the animated series, I’m aware that this is no small feat. Unfortunately, overall, the plan fails. It’s supposed to be epic, but the whole thing feels clunky, rushed and at times incomprehensible. You might not have to boycott this movie — it’s so bad, it could boycott itself.

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Not having ever seen a single second of the cartoon, I’m in no danger of stumbling into theatres for this one. My “boycott” of Last Airbender carries little water — I would never have been interested in seeing the movie anyways.

That being said, I do support the “boycott Last Airbender” movement that’s circulating the Internets — mainly because M. Night Shyamalan is proving himself to be a downright idiot. After catching wind of the Racebending.com-led boycott, Shyamalan lost his ever-lovin’ mind in a recent interview.

Here’s Shyamalan’s full rant on the subject of race and The Last Airbender:

Q: There’s been a lot of controversy regarding the casting and how all the heroes are being portrayed by Caucasian actors, while all the villains are all being portrayed by non-Caucasians. How do you respond to those who are saying that The Last Airbender is racist?

M Night Shyamalan: ‘Well, you caught me. I’m the face of racism. I’m always surprised at the level of misunderstanding, the sensitivities that exist. As an Asian-American, it bothers me when people take all of their passion and rightful indignation about the subject and then misplace it. Here’s the reality: first of all, the Uncle Iroh character is the Yoda character in the movie, and it would be like saying that Yoda was a villain. So he’s Persian.

 And Dev Patel is the actual hero of the series, and he’s Indian, OK? The whole point of the movie is that there isn’t any bad or good. The irony is that I’m playing on the exact prejudices that the people who are claiming I’m racist are doing. They immediately assume that everyone with dark skin is a villain. That was an incredibly racist assumption which as it turns out is completely incorrect.

There are four nations, and I had to eventually make a decision about what nationality each of them are. What happened was, Noah Ringer walked in the door – and there was no other human being on the planet that could play Aang except for this kid. To me, he felt mixed race with an Asian quality to him. I made all the Air nomads mixed race – some of them are Hispanic, some of them are Korean. Every monk you see in a flashback, in that world, are all mixed race because they’re nomadic. I felt that really worked as a culture. OK, so that’s one-quarter of our world population. The second group is the Fire Nation; when Dev was cast as Zuko, I said, OK, I have to cast an Uncle Iroh that looks like his uncle. We’re going to go from Indian/Persian to Mediterranean, all that group with all its darker colors including Italians.

So now we’re at one-half of the population of the movie which is not white.

Moving on to the third group, which is the Earth kingdom (which is the biggest kingdom in this fictional world): I liked a bunch of the people who happened to be Japanese, Korean, Philippine, so I decided to make the Earth kingdom Asians. Now we’re at three-quarters of the world. Now I have the brother and sister left. If you don’t have an edict of “don’t put white people in the movie” then the Water tribe can be European/Caucasian. So that’s how it ended up.

Here’s the irony of the conversation: The Last Airbender is the most culturally diverse movie series of all time. I’m not talking about maybe one Jedi, maybe one person of a different color – no one’s even close. That’s a great pride to me. The irony of this statement enrages me to the point of … not even the accusation, but the misplacement of it. You’re coming at me, the one Asian filmmaker who has the right to cast anybody I want, and I’m casting this entire movie in this color blind way where everyone is represented. I even had one section of the Earth kingdom as African American, which obviously isn’t in the show, but I wanted to represent them, too!

And I fought like crazy to have the pronunciation of the names to go back to the Asian pronunciation. So you say “Ahng” instead of “Aaang” because it’s correct. It’s not “I-rack,” it’s “ee-Rock.” I’m literally fighting for all this. And who’s getting blamed? ME! This is incredible. And so it’s infuriating, this stigmatization, that the first word about the most culturally-diverse movie of all time is this accusation. And here’s the irony of it, this has nothing to do with the studio system. I had complete say in casting. So if you need to point the racist finger, point it at me, and if it doesn’t stick, then be quiet.

Whenever we’re on set, it’s crazy, I love it. We’re in our cafeteria, it looks like the United Nations in there! And you’re not supposed to be thinking about this because it’s so diverse. And again, this is what really frustrates me, when we get to the second movie (hopefully), since its based in the Earth Kingdom, suddenly the movie will seem entirely politically correct Asian, and the accusers will feel like they won. YOU DID NOT WIN! YOU DID NOT WIN! That’s not what happened, you were wrong. As you can tell, it’s a frustrating thing. Look at the movie poster with Dev Patel in it. I’m not understanding … he’s not politically correct?

I could go on for half an hour on that subject … in the end it’s like that saying, “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

At the basis of this, a fascinating thing, it didn’t even occur to me until the first mention of this came up: The art form of Anime in and of itself is what’s causing the confusion. The Anime artists intentionally put ambiguous features on the characters so that you see who you want to see in it. It’s part of the art form. My daughter looks identical to Katara; I saw my family in that series when I was watching it, I saw them in the faces. I’m sure that every household feels the same way in that they see their own families in them. It’s a fascinating thing about how people perceive it. If there’s an issue with why Anime does not put particularly specific Asian features from the PC Asian types that people think should be there … take it up with Anime animators. It has nothing to do with me.’

Let’s parse this out, shall we?

First of all, no one claimed that M. Night Shyamalan was “the face of racism”. For the most part, race activists have questioned the casting of The Last Airbender, specifically asking why the casting agents specifically sought out a Caucasian actor to play the role. They want to know why Katara and Sokka are also played by white actors, and why the Fire Nation (which is war-mongering and violent) was re-cast as dark-skinned. Personally, I don’t think Shyamalan was being racist — I think he was oblivious to the larger implications of his attempts to be racially inclusive while still have White leading characters. Shyamalan’s not guilty of being racist, he’s guilty of being kinda dumb on this one. That being said, a lot of this sounds like Shyamalan’s having a Kanye West moment: he’s pissed he’s not being recognized by race activists for making “the most culturally diverse movie series of all time”, so he’s doing the film director equivalent of stealing the mic from Taylor Swift.

"I'm really happy for you, Taylor, but I just had to say, I had one of the most culturally diverse movie series of all time."

I really have no comment on whether or not Dev Patel’s character in the Avatar  series is a hero or a villain, having never watched the cartoon. I know that the Fire Nation — the primary villains of the trilogy — are cast as the Big Bad, and they are brown. Can you have not-so-bad bad guys who are brown? Sure. But that doesn’t get around the visual of the Big Bad whom the hero is fighting being inexplicably brown-skinned (particularly when they are light-skinned in the cartoon). And guess what — it’s not racist to question the perpetuation of a Hollywood trope that casts minorities principally as villains (redeemed or otherwise).

Someone please tell me how a non-mixed race person can have a “mixed race” feel. Please? Is M. Night Shyamalan arguing that Noah Ringer can pass as ethnically ambiguous? ‘Cuz I really don’t buy that. And, as for whether or not Ringer is “the only human being on the planet” who could play Aang — Phil is skeptical of that statement.

If Last Airbender 2 comes out, and most of the cast is East Asian because the Earth Kingdom is East Asian, I will not call that a victory. I DID NOT WIN! I DID NOT WIN! (Wait, do we ordinarily get trophies for this kind of thing? Did mine get lost in the mail or something?) I’m familiar enough with the cartoon’s storyline now to accept that if the second movie has a bunch of Asians in it, it’s because M. Night Shyamalan is sticking to his wacky racial casting thing with the four Nations in the storyline. We’re not that stupid, Mr. Shyamalan. But here’s one thing I don’t get (and maybe folks familiar with the cartoon can clue me in): how is it that three of the Nations (Air, Water and Fire) can be cast as cultures sharing a similar race or skin colour (mixed race, Native, and “darker” respectively, according to Shyamalan), but than there’s somehow room in the Earth Nation to include both East Asian and Black people? From an anthropological point of view, from an evolutionary genetics point of view, from a sociological point of view — that doesn’t make sense.

As for anime, jaehwan over at bigWOWO had some discussion about how Asians view the race of anime characters. In short, anime is not “ethnically ambiguous”; the anime art style was originally inspired and influenced by Western animation (specifically Disney). Asians in Asia don’t consider the characters in anime to be White because of the size of their eyes — that would assume that Asians universally see ourselves as small-eyed people (we don’t). In the case of most anime, the minimalism of the facial features provides little racial or ethnic information, and anime style involves large eyes primarily to make characters cuter — since a larger eye-to-face ratio reminds most people of babies.

Sufficed to say, many characters in anime are Asian — which can be determined based on their darker eye and hair colour, and the context of the story). By contrast, Caucasian characters tend to have blonde or red hair, and blue or green eyes — as with Asuka in Neon Genesis Evangelion. So, M. Night has it wrong: anime isn’t ethnically ambiguous, they just don’t provide the racial indicators that Western audiences are familiar with, so Western audiences tend to project a “White default” assumption onto what they perceive as racially ambiguous art styles.

As I said, I am unenthused about The Last Airbender. I’m not going to see it, but I really wasn’t going to see it anyways. But I’m definitely disturbed by how M. Night Shyamalan is showing his true, and kind of self-absorbed asshat, colours.

"Yo! I'm really happy for you, M. Night, and I'ma let you finish, but I just want to say that you might be one of the biggest asshats of all time."

Daniel Wu, Margaret Cho Talk Asian American Diversity in Hollywood

Daniel Wu, apparently also suffering from that pesky "shirt amnesia" that plagues other gorgeous APIA men, like Daniel Dae Kim and Rain.

With the depressing dearth of Asian American characters in movies and television, Asian American actors carry a heavy weight because every role they accept contributes to the stereotyping, or not, of Asian Americans. There are only a handful of prominent Asian American roles in Hollywood, so each role appears to have greater significance in shaping the image of Asians in American pop culture.

Too often, it feels as if Asian American actors are stuck at a crossroads, having to choose between poverty and obscurity, or playing the stereotypical, degrading Asian American caricature. And, unfortunately, there are Asian American actors who seem willing and eager to play those roles.

But then, you stumble upon the Asian American actor who is surprisingly race conscious. That’s what happened to me when I read this Canadian interview with Daniel Wu, a Chinese American actor who has been dubbed the “young Andy Lau” for his film success in Asian cinema. Here’s a wonderful excerpt from the article, highlighting Wu’s awareness of identity politics:

Having achieved success in Hong Kong, Wu now hopes he can break into Hollywood as a positive example for a new generation of Asians.

“I would like there to be some kind of Asian-American role model for the kids out there today,” Wu told The Associated Press on Sunday as he promoted his new action thriller, “Triple Tap.”

As a youngster in Orinda, California, Wu said there were few Asian faces on the big screen he could look up to. Instead, there was Long Duk Dong — the awkward foreign exchange student parodied in the 1984 high-school comedy “Sixteen Candles.” So Wu found inspiration in a Chinatown video rental shop, devouring the movies of Chan, Bruce Lee and Jet Li, aspiring to “be in a Jackie Chan movie and be kicked down a flight of stairs.”

His fascination with Hong Kong cinema led to a trip to the former British colony in 1997 to witness its handover to China. Out of funds, he tried modeling and was spotted by a Hong Kong director in a fashion ad.

Thirteen years later, he has 50 movies under his belt and is one of the Chinese-language industry’s biggest stars. Childhood idol Chan has become a frequent screen partner, most recently in the Tokyo-set drama “Shinjuku Incident.” With a summer blockbuster due out on Thursday and clothing, watch and skin care endorsements, it’s hard to miss Wu’s picture in this wealthy shopping-crazed city of 7 million people.

Now Wu is hoping to leverage his reputation in the land of his ancestors to correct the cinematic prejudices of his home country. He recently signed with the Hollywood talent broker Creative Artists Agency.

“It’s amazing that 30 years later, there still aren’t (positive Asian-American role models). And I would like to help change that,” he said.

In the interview, Wu talks about turning down roles that he feels only perpetuate Asian and Asian American stereotypes in the minds of non-Asian audiences. I suppose that the struggling Asian American actor in Hollywood might argue that Wu, having made his name in Asia, has the kind of fame and personal wealth to be able to be choosy about roles — and it’s a fair point. That being said, I do think that Wu should be commended for having the kind of integrity to not play the Asian American buffoon.  

Meanwhile, Margaret Cho — no stranger to the world of identity politics activism — also spent some time talking about Asian American diversity on television. In Drop Dead Diva, she plays Teri who struggles in a recent episode with the news that her cousin will be deported. 

Margaret Cho on "Drop Dead Diva"

In a recent interview, Cho talked about using her show to address racialized political issues in today’s America, both in front of, and behind, the camera:

Cho, who plays Teri, told Zap2It that she approved of a recent storyline in which her character’s cousin faced deportation.

“When I was just a kid, when I was just born, my father was deported,” she explained. “So it was something that I experienced with my family. It was interesting they did that story.”

Cho continued: “It seems to me to be very true to the immigrant experience and it is timely. We’re kind of coming up around the issues of what is American. Does American actually always mean white? I think it’s a great conversation to have. So I’m proud of the episode. I’m really glad that we got to do it.”

She added that working with other Asian-American actors was a “rare opportunity”.

“In shows, it’s usually just one of us,” she explained. “It’s very rare to have more than one Asian-American actor on anything ever. So it was this special, really rare, cool thing for us to hang out.”

Love her or hate her, you can always count on Margaret Cho to at least stimulate discussions of race and identity in Hollywood. And I, for one, am glad she’s willing to do it.

Karate Kid Remake a Mixed Bag of Stereotypes

My latest post over at Change.org:

Karate Kid Remake a Mixed Bag of Stereotypes

The 1984 film Karate Kid was a classic. If you were born in the 80s, you can probably remember spending hours practicing crane kicks and “wax on-wax off” technique as a child — all while fantasizing about beating up the evil Cobra Kai. So it’s no wonder that the Karate Kid films are being remade for a new generation of moviegoers to appreciate.

Unfortunately, this year’s updated Karate Kid (which made $19 million on its opening night) comes complete with a mixed bag of stereotypes that are raising eyebrows in the Asian-American community.

Okay, it’s not like the original Karate Kid films were without their fair share of stereotypes. While growing up, I had to remind kids that — unlike Mr. Miyagi — I did not possess the magical ability to heal people with a single clap of my hands. I could not catch flies with my chopsticks. I do, in fact, speak English fluently.

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Red Dawn: A Contemporary Remake of Yellow Peril Hysteria?

My latest post over at Change.org:

Red Dawn: A Contemporary Remake of Yellow Peril Hysteria?

Recently, I blogged over at Reappropriate.com about why I am boycotting The Last Airbender and Prince of Persia: both films reinforce backwards racial stereotypes of good and evil. But perhaps no film this year will be more racially divisive than the remake of Red Dawn, slated for release this November.

For those of you who missed the 1984 original, Red Dawn follows a group of American teenagers who face the sudden invasion of their tiny Colorado town by allied Cuban and Russian Communist forces. After surviving the initial attack on their town, the teens learn to survive in the surrounding Colorado wilderness. Ultimately, they form a rebel militia dubbed the “Wolverines,” and resort to guerilla terrorism to resist the Russian and Cuban occupying forces. By the film’s end, the Wolverines have morphed into American freedom fighters and patriots.

The 1984 Red Dawn film has been simultaneously praised as one of the best right-wing films of all time, and criticized as “xenophobic,” “survivalist porn” that caters to crazed militiamen. It comes as no surprise, therefore, that MGM decided to remake the movie, betting on the cult classic status of the original to draw in contemporary viewers.

Except this time around, the new villain is China.

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Boycotting “The Last Airbender” and “Prince of Persia”

I must have a really juvenile sense of humour, because every time I hear the phrase "airbender", I think about farts.

I don’t know nothun’ ‘bout “Avatar: The Last Airbender”. Seriously. I haven’t seen so much as five seconds of the cartoon. Heck, I generally avoid Nickelodeon products like the plague. Maybe that makes me a bad fangirl. I don’t know. But that’s also why I’m like a year late on blogging about the racial controversy surrounding this movie.

What I do know about Avatar: The Last Airbender is what I read about on Wikipedia. The show sounds a little bit like an updated version of Dragonball. Basically, Avatar is set in an Asian-inspired fantasy world where people are capable of manipulating the four elements: earth, air, fire and water. The main character of the show, named Aang, is an Avatar — which makes him special in a way that the Wikipedia articles fail to adequately explain. From there, it seems as if Aang (who starts out with an Airbending ability), and his animal familiar — a flying… buffalo… — embark on some crazy adventures to learn how to manipulate the remaining three elements and take out a genocidal Fire lord person.

The internal monologue of this creature: "why do I live???"

The point here is that Aang, and many of his friends, are supposed to be clearly Asian. In fact, the Avatar world is based on many East Asian (and particularly Buddhist) concepts of chi, martial arts, and reincarnation. Not having watched Avatar, I was a little skeptical of exactly how obviously Asian the world of Avatar was — until I read that in Season 2, one of the characters learns to manipulate the fifth element: metal. The idea there being a fifth natural element, and that it is metal, is a uniquely East Asian idea. So, colour me convinced — Aang and his friends are Asian.

And as any parent of colour will tell you, finding shows and toys that help reinforce positive racial identification is quintessential. As CNN demonstrated in their updated Doll Test, kids rapidly internalize racial stereotypes of good and bad from TV and movies, particularly when they aren’t exposed to any other explicit discussions of race. When kids see images on television of good, smart kids being overwhelmingly White, while bad, dumb kids are overwhelmingly Black, they make connections between personal attributes and skin colour that alter their perception of the world. Hence, when kids are shown images of identical dolls differing only in skin tone, they will associate lighter skin tone with positive attributes and darker skin tone with negative attributes. This occurs regardless of the child’s own skin colour; in the CNN doll test, even Black children demonstrated preference towards lighter-skinned dolls. What remarkable self-hate these children are learning at the ages of 2 and younger — and all because of the dearth of positive, minority protagonists in children’s shows and toys.

No child of mine is going to grow up thinking that they are ugly or stupid because of their race. If and when I am a parent, my kids will not get blonde-haired, blue-eyed Barbie dolls for Christmas. I’ll probably be the parent who buys their kids the Jade Bratz or the Quick Kick G.I. Joe. My future children will watch Ni Hao, Kai Lan until their eyes bleed.

I want my kids to think that the original Power Rangers was all about the Yellow Ranger -- all them other Rangers were just backdrop. She got the coolest Zord anyways -- saber-toothed tiger versus a frickin' stegasaurus? No contest.

So, I can only imagine how valuable a show like Avatar: The Last Airbender is to today’s Asian parents, who use shows like these to instill some measure of racial self-esteem in their children.

And I can only imagine their disappointment rage when they learned that the live-action feature film based on the show, called just The Last Airbender (because, of course, the term “Avatar” is now inextricably linked to blue cat-people), was going to star a virtually all-White cast. Both Aang and Katara, the male and female protagonists, are played by unmistakably Caucasian actors (even though Katara is actually brown-skinned in the cartoon). The studios did the same calculus here that they did for other American remakes of classic Asian films (including The Ring, My Sassy Girl, and The Departed): there’s a belief in Hollywood that while Asian stories will sell, Asian faces won’t. These film executives are sending the message: “Asians simply aren’t familiar enough — not “American” enough — for White movie audiences to relate to”.

So you end up with White-washing of Asian movies and the take-home message, yet again, that Asians aren’t good enough to be the heroes. We’re neither good enough to play romantic leads nor are we heroic enough to have elemental energy-balls shooting out of our hands. Is it any wonder that kids are colourstruck?

To add insult to injury, apparently minorities aren’t good enough to play heroes, but we’re totally bad enough to play the villains. Not like I really know anything about Avatar, but from what I’ve read, the Fire Nation = the bad guys. And lo and behold — the folks behind The Last Airbender have no problem casting people of colour in the roles of the evil Fire people. Cliff Curtis, who is of Maori descent, plays the Big Bad Firelord Ozai. Aasif Mandvi and Dev Patel, two Asian Indian actors, play Firelord Ozai’s right-hand man and his son, respectively.

Which means that The Last Airbender is going to be two hours of eye-candy schlock, reinforcing the same tired message to kids: White = good and heroic, and Brown = evil and genocidal. 

The world according to "The Last Airbender"

Not like I was rushing off to pre-purchase my Last Airbender tickets on Fandango, but I’m with Gene Yang on this one: boycott, please!?

And, while we’re on the subjectPrince of Persia (set to hit theatres this Friday) is yet another example of the White-washing of American cinema. I first saw the trailer for this movie in the theaters, and I literally (and I do mean literally — electroman can attest) yelled out to the screen in front of a crowded theatre audience, “What the FUCK?!? Jake Gyllenhaal‘s not Persian!” 

Jake Gyllenhaal has apparently mistaken being Persian with being almost criminally ungroomed. "Defy the future"? How about, "defy all sanity"?

You can’t fake your race with a bottle tan and four weeks of facial hair growth, Jake! Gemma Arterton, who plays the love interest of the Prince of Somwhere-That-Is-Clearly-Not-Persia, is British (although, at least she, unlike Jake Gyllenhaal, uses an accent to sound vaguely… uhm, Persian-ish?). And again, the White-washing of the cast is reserved only for the movie’s protagonists: Ben Kingsley, one of the most famous Asian Indian actors around, plays the primary villain of the movie.  

Really? Way to ruin the first computer game I every played, Disney. Thanks, but no thanks. I think I’ll be boycotting that one, too.  

Dear Jake Gyllenhaal: I think I just learned how to quit you.

Act Now! Join me (and a whole bunch of other angry Asians) in boycotting The Last Airbender when it hits theatres this July 2nd, and in boycotting Prince of Persia this Friday.